Experiment One MTG Card


Card setsReleased in 9 setsSee all
Mana cost
Converted mana cost1
RarityUncommon
TypeCreature — Human Ooze
Abilities Evolve
Power 1
Toughness 1

Experiment One Key Takeaways

  1. Experiment One offers no direct card advantage but grows to outclass threats and force opponents to use more resources.
  2. Can regenerate effectively at sort-of instant speed to counter removal spells, enhancing its board longevity.
  3. Though its mana cost is low, expanding its power demands further investment in creature plays.

Text of card Experiment One

Evolve (Whenever a creature enters the battlefield under your control, if that creature has greater power or toughness than this creature, put a +1/+1 counter on this creature.) Remove two +1/+1 counters from Experiment One: Regenerate Experiment One.

Experiment One is dissected in this informative post, revealing its growth and resilience in the world of MTG. Understand its mechanics and strategic advantages.

Key Takeaways

  1. Experiment One offers no direct card advantage but grows to outclass threats and force opponents to use more resources.
  2. Can regenerate effectively at sort-of instant speed to counter removal spells, enhancing its board longevity.
  3. Though its mana cost is low, expanding its power demands further investment in creature plays.

Card Pros

Card Advantage: Experiment One does not directly provide card advantage in the traditional sense; however, it’s a creature that can grow and become a significant board presence. Its ability to evolve allows it to potentially outmatch opponents’ creatures, indirectly leading to card advantage by dealing better with threats and requiring opponents to use more resources to handle it.

Resource Acceleration: While Experiment One itself does not offer resource acceleration, its low mana cost and quick growth make it an efficient asset for an overwhelming early game. Deploying this card can lead to a tempo advantage, compelling opponents to respond earlier than they might want to, thereby accelerating the pace at which you dictate the game.

Instant Speed: Experiment One’s interactions predominantly occur at sorcery speed due to it being a creature. However, its Regenerate ability gives it resilience which, when timed correctly, can be used almost like an instant to save it from destruction. This strategic use of regeneration can effectively counteract removal spells during an opponent’s turn, akin to the benefits of instant speed actions.

Card Cons

Discard Requirement: While Experiment One doesn’t have a direct discard requirement, fostering its evolution mechanic often necessitates sacrificing creatures which can be akin to discarding valuable assets. This trade-off can leave players at a disadvantage, especially in decks that rely on maintaining a broad presence on the battlefield.

Specific Mana Cost: Experiment One requires green mana to cast. This specificity can pose limitations for multicolored decks that might struggle with mana fixing or wish to prioritize other colors for their early-game strategy.

Comparatively High Mana Cost: Despite Experiment One having a low individual mana cost, evolving it requires a substantial ongoing mana investment into other creatures. This can be less efficient compared to single-card options that might grow independently or provide immediate value upon entering the battlefield.

Reasons to Include in Your Collection

Versatility: Experiment One excels in a variety of decks that capitalize on creature synergies, particularly those seeking to utilize +1/+1 counters. Its adaptability allows it to fit seamlessly into aggro and midrange decks that aim to grow their board presence rapidly.

Combo Potential: With its evolve mechanic, this card thrives alongside other creatures that can trigger its ability to grow, paving the way for strong synergistic plays. It’s a key component in decks that exploit +1/+1 counters to unlock powerful interactions and secure board advantage.

Meta-Relevance: Experiment One shines in a meta that favors creature-based strategies. Its ability to become progressively stronger and its built-in regeneration make it a resilient threat that can withstand various forms of removal, keeping it relevant in ever-shifting meta landscapes.

Similar Cards

Experiment One is a notable creature card within Magic: The Gathering, presenting similarities to other cards with the evolve mechanic, such as Cloudfin Raptor. Both of these creatures grow in strength and toughness as you play larger creatures, with Experiment One having the added benefit of regeneration, making it a persistent threat on the board. Cloudfin Raptor, while it doesn’t have regeneration, does gain evasion with flying, thus possessing its own tactical advantages depending on the battlefield situation.

Exploring further, we encounter another relative in Pelt Collector, a card that not only gets stronger and larger with every creature that dies but also gains trample if it’s big enough, adding considerable pressure on your opponent. Although lacking the regenerate ability, Pelt Collector’s trample provides a direct way to translate its growing power into potential player damage.

While each of these cards offers its unique synergy within the evolve theme, Experiment One stands out with a resilience that ensures its place in many decks. Its ability to withstand removal and return to the field makes it an extremely reliable, if not somewhat formidable, creature among those that evolve.

How to beat

Experiment One is a flexible creature card, known for its resilience and ability to evolve in Magic: The Gathering. As it gains +1/+1 counters from the evolve mechanic, it can quickly become a formidable presence on the battlefield. Overcoming Experiment One often requires a tactical approach, especially since it can regenerate. Timing is key. Removal spells that don’t destroy Experiment One are usually more effective after it has already utilized its regeneration ability, as it cannot use this ability again until the next turn. Board wipes like Wrath of God can also be useful as they get around the regeneration by not destroying the creature.

Employing -1/-1 effects can be particularly efficient against Experiment One, as these make it harder for it to survive through regeneration. Additionally, exiling the creature is a surefire method to deal with it permanently. Cards like Path to Exile or the more recent exile spells provide a clean answer to this evolving threat. Additionally, focusing on strategies that don’t depend on one-for-one removal can limit Experiment One’s impact. Instead, by crafting a strategy that outweighs or outpaces the growth potential of Experiment One, you can mitigate the card’s significance in your opponent’s game plan.

BurnMana Recommendations

If you’re intrigued by Experiment One’s potential in MTG, its tenacity and evolving nature make it an intriguing choice for your deck. Understanding how to leverage its strengths and mitigate its weaknesses is key to mastering the battlefield. Curious about incorporating Experiment One into your deck or finding alternatives that complement its unique mechanics? We’re here to deepen your insights on evolve strategies, synergies with other creatures, and ways to get an edge over the competition. Dive into our comprehensive guides and further your journey toward becoming an adept player with a nuanced understanding of the MTG realm. Embark on the quest for mastery today.

Similar Cards

Experiment One is a notable creature card within Magic: The Gathering, presenting similarities to other cards with the evolve mechanic, such as Cloudfin Raptor. Both of these creatures grow in strength and toughness as you play larger creatures, with Experiment One having the added benefit of regeneration, making it a persistent threat on the board. Cloudfin Raptor, while it doesn’t have regeneration, does gain evasion with flying, thus possessing its own tactical advantages depending on the battlefield situation.

Exploring further, we encounter another relative in Pelt Collector, a card that not only gets stronger and larger with every creature that dies but also gains trample if it’s big enough, adding considerable pressure on your opponent. Although lacking the regenerate ability, Pelt Collector’s trample provides a direct way to translate its growing power into potential player damage.

While each of these cards offers its unique synergy within the evolve theme, Experiment One stands out with a resilience that ensures its place in many decks. Its ability to withstand removal and return to the field makes it an extremely reliable, if not somewhat formidable, creature among those that evolve.

Similar cards to Experiment One to use in your decks

Cloudfin Raptor - Gatecrash (GTC)
Pelt Collector - Guilds of Ravnica (GRN)

Where to buy Experiment One MTG card?

If you're looking to purchase Experiment One MTG card by a specific set like Magic Online Promos and Gatecrash, there are several reliable options to consider. One of the primary sources is your local game store, where you can often find booster packs, individual cards, and preconstructed decks from current and some past sets. They often offer the added benefit of a community where you can trade with other players.

For a broader inventory, particularly of older sets, online marketplaces like TCGPlayer, Card Kingdom and Card Market offer extensive selections and allow you to search for cards from specific sets. Larger e-commerce platforms like eBay and Amazon also have listings from various sellers, which can be a good place to look for sealed product and rare finds.

Additionally, Magic’s official site often has a store locator and retailer lists for finding Wizards of the Coast licensed products. Remember to check for authenticity and the condition of the cards when purchasing, especially from individual sellers on larger marketplaces.

Below is a list of some store websites where you can buy the Experiment One and other MTG cards:

Continue exploring other sealed products in Amazon
See Magic products

Experiment One card sets

The Experiment One Magic the Gathering card was released in 8 different sets between 2013-02-01 and 2024-01-12. Illustrated by 2 different artists.

#ReleaseNameCodeSymbolNumberFrameLayoutBorderArtist
12002-06-24Magic Online PromosPRM 498382003normalblackJack Wang
22013-02-01GatecrashGTC 1192003normalblackChase Stone
32015-11-13Commander 2015C15 1842015normalblackChase Stone
42019-02-15RNA Guild KitGK2 1112015normalblackChase Stone
52019-11-07Mystery BoosterMB1 12012015normalblackChase Stone
62020-09-26The ListPLST C15-1842015normalblackChase Stone
72022-07-08Double Masters 20222X2 1462015normalblackJack Wang
82024-01-12Ravnica RemasteredRVR 3461997normalblackChase Stone
92024-01-12Ravnica RemasteredRVR 1372015normalblackChase Stone

Card legalities

Magic the Gathering formats where Experiment One has restrictions

FormatLegality
CommanderLegal
LegacyLegal
PaupercommanderLegal
ModernLegal
OathbreakerLegal
PauperLegal
VintageLegal
DuelLegal
PioneerLegal

Rules and information about Experiment One

The reference guide for Magic: The Gathering Experiment One card rulings provides official rulings, any errata issued, as well as a record of all the functional modifications that have occurred.

DateText
2013-01-24 If removing two +1/+1 counters from Experiment One causes the amount of damage already marked on Experiment One to be equal to or greater than its toughness, it will be put into its owner’s graveyard as a state-based action before the regeneration shield is created.
2013-04-15 If a creature enters the battlefield with +1/+1 counters on it, consider those counters when determining if evolve will trigger. For example, a 1/1 creature that enters the battlefield with two +1/+1 counters on it will cause the evolve ability of a 2/2 creature to trigger.
2013-04-15 If evolve triggers, the stat comparison will happen again when the ability tries to resolve. If neither stat of the new creature is greater, the ability will do nothing. If the creature that entered the battlefield leaves the battlefield before evolve tries to resolve, use its last known power and toughness to compare the stats.
2013-04-15 If multiple creatures enter the battlefield at the same time, evolve may trigger multiple times, although the stat comparison will take place each time one of those abilities tries to resolve. For example, if you control a 2/2 creature with evolve and two 3/3 creatures enter the battlefield, evolve will trigger twice. The first ability will resolve and put a +1/+1 counter on the creature with evolve. When the second ability tries to resolve, neither the power nor the toughness of the new creature is greater than that of the creature with evolve, so that ability does nothing.
2013-04-15 When comparing the stats as the evolve ability resolves, it’s possible that the stat that’s greater changes from power to toughness or vice versa. If this happens, the ability will still resolve and you’ll put a +1/+1 counter on the creature with evolve. For example, if you control a 2/2 creature with evolve and a 1/3 creature enters the battlefield under your control, it toughness is greater so evolve will trigger. In response, the 1/3 creature gets +2/-2. When the evolve trigger tries to resolve, its power is greater. You’ll put a +1/+1 counter on the creature with evolve.
2013-04-15 When comparing the stats of the two creatures for evolve, you always compare power to power and toughness to toughness.
2013-04-15 Whenever a creature enters the battlefield under your control, check its power and toughness against the power and toughness of the creature with evolve. If neither stat of the new creature is greater, evolve won’t trigger at all.

Recent MTG decks

Continue exploring other format decks
More decks

Recent MTG articles

Continue exploring articles
More articles